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Showing content with the highest reputation on 07/12/21 in all areas

  1. On the contrary, Christian -- hopefully once the dust settles and animosity fades, you'll realize that the benefit to you came from the training itself and not the ornament that was affixed at the end. And when that happens, hopefully you'll be motivated to pursue the additional ratings even if they end up restructured into oblivion one day down the road, because you'll still be benefitting from the knowledge and experience gained. When I started on VATSIM in 2010 one of the first learning endeavors I underwent was the ZLA Pilot Cert program, authored and administered by then-ZLA ATM Keith Smith. When I completed it, my name went up on their website, and I was definitely proud of the accomplishment. Keith has since gone on to create and run PilotEdge where they run a similar training program. The ZLA program on VATSIM vanished some time after that, but I still count it among the most beneficial things I ever did when starting on VATSIM even though there's no longer any public record confirming my memory of having completed it. I've also done the Boston Vitual ARTCC "Wings Over New England" flights once through about six years ago. I found them to be very similar in structure to the ZLA Pilot Cert program, but still found it a valuable refresher with some minor pieces of info here and there that I didn't know before then. I am currently about halfway through doing them again, just for the benefit of the refresher (and to pick up on the few things they've tweaked and added since 2015). And even though I myself had my P1-through-P5 knocked back to a P1 and P2 when the "official" VATSIM ratings were restructured, I've since undertaken the "new" P3 which indeed went much more in-depth into multi-engine piston flying than I've ever simulated before, and I learned a ton doing it. Long story short -- hopefully the sting of having your rating downgraded is a temporary setback and will be overcome by the realization that the knowledge and experience is the true reason for taking the courses. A good pilot never stops learning. And I'm all about pretending to be a good pilot. 😉
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  2. I'll just add one more thing that wasn't addressed already. Airspace maps and the VATSIM online maps can be misleading when it comes to what radar (TRACON or En-Route) controller covers what airports because airspace design is more complex than as depicted on maps. POU, even though it appears underneath Boston Center on maps is in fact controlled by the NY TRACON and gets covered top-down by NY Center if the appropriate sector isn't online. You can determine this by looking at the airport entry in SkyVector https://skyvector.com/airport/POU/Hudson-Valley-Regional-Airport or AirNav https://www.airnav.com/airport/KPOU There is an ARTCC entry indicating New York Center and under Airport Communications there are entries for New York Approach and Departure.
    1 point
  3. As Robert was alluding to, ATC frequencies in the US are still issued in a frequency format based on a 25 kHz frequency spacing, which, practically speaking, means that any frequency that ends in a .02 or .07 is actually going to be .025 or .075. So if a controller says contact New York Center on 125.32, you would tune your 25 kHz radio to 125.32 and it would tune to 125.325. If your aircraft uses 8.33 kHz spacing--which a lot of simulated aircraft are doing these days--you may have to add the extra 5 at the end of the frequency, when appropriate. This is one of those things that is a holdover from the early VATSIM days when only five digits were used on the network and the third digit after the decimal was ignored. Since network and simulator technology has changed, this kind of frequency confusion has occasionally cropped up.
    1 point
  4. haha, Daniel, I apologise for explaining the event to you. Won't happen again.
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