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Showing content with the highest reputation on 10/14/22 in all areas

  1. Drop the hook, stabilize, and aim for the three-wire. The suspension does the rest of the work.
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  2. Screenshot at 0800z on Friday 14 Oct.
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  3. Dear friends, In our ATC clients, we have the .break command to alert adjacent controllers that we are on break - i.e. not accepting handoffs, about to close, or going AFK for a short moment. Once the .break command is used, the controller is highlighted in the ATC's controller list as being on break. I was wondering if there would be value in making this highlighted state also visible to pilots in their pilot clients, that way pilots might know not to call at that very moment, or at least have an idea why they are not receiving a response to their call (especially on, say, a 30-60 second bathroom break). I wanted to start this discussion because I've had this idea in the back of my mind since I became a VATSIM ATC about 8 years ago, and now I would like to hear your thoughts on this as well. Thank you for your time,
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  4. We use specific words and phrases that are designed to be unambiguous. That is why standard phraseology exists. It is for the purpose of safety, and never has phraseology been adjusted to accommodate how those words and phrases make the pilot/controller feel. That is why trying to legislate a problem like this away is utter nonsense -- we are not improving efficiency, or safety, or improving communication in any meaningful way. This is an attempt to shoehorn an entirely political issue into a professional environment under the guise of empathy. I can agree that not allowing VATSIM members to change their names is a bit of a strange issue. However, it has been stated earlier that the process exists, but it is simply inaccessible for those who are unable to provide supporting documentation. Whether or not an individual has access to such supporting documentation is not the responsibility of VATSIM. The policy exists to -- if previous posts are to be believed -- protect minors and ensure that law enforcement can contact at-risk or predatory VATSIM members if necessary. There is, of course, a solution: allow members to insert their full, legal name, in addition to a "preferred name" which they can use instead. However, both names must be accessible in order to further the goals of the legal name policy.
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  5. Are you saying you can't say "he" and "she" in Finnish? On the other hand, despite the fact that French genderises ALL nouns, they do have a genderless third person pronoun, "lui." Also, their word for "aircraft" is masculine, and given that pilots are referred to by ATC according to the callsign of the aircraft, it could be argued that using "he" in reference to the aircraft ahead crossing left to right, would be correct... if we were speaking in French... :)
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  6. Oh another one of these posts.... I'm fairly open about my experience as a transgender woman on this network if the topic ever arises. I was lucky enough to be helped when I couldn't get legal documents at the time (recently just got my new birth certificate with my name and sex on it after years of government meddling!!) and have been fortunate enough to get called she/her and ma'am on the network because of my passing voice. That however is a fairy tale for a lot of trans people, especially trans women who are on the short end of the stick when it comes to being recognised as who they are, especially on a platform so heavily focused on voice-only communication. Is that the fault of the people on the other ending saying "sir" or "he" on the radio about them? No... I guarantee you no one looks at the name of the pilot before speaking to them. I do to recognise people I know, but I doubt I'm in the majority. I get called he in the sense of "taxi behind the company A320 after he passes left to right", but thats just out of the culture that a lot of aviation enthusiasts have. I'm sure if we were 99% female then it would be she all the time... I wish lol There's so many arguments for name changes as well, but I hope we can all agree that erring on the side of being inclusive and giving the benefit of the doubt is what's best in the long run for our hobby. There will always be people looking to abuse the system to try and do unlawful or malicious things on here, but the story of a trans woman tends not to be that. Creepy men will just go into a womens bathroom (to use a politically relevant example) if they want to... no point going through an entire transition just to do that. It's very easy to tell when someone isn't genuine. In the end, being called sir doesn't bother me. I find the idea of using that honorific on the network weird anyway. I'm just an 18 year old girl controlling in her bedroom avoiding an essay due soon, no need to be that respectful xD But, there are so many people it will bother. It only takes a small amount of effort over time to adjust to being gender neutral to people who you don't know, and for the majority of people who don't care, the minority who genuinely do care will thank you for it.
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  7. We will not come together here on the details, because I do not think that it will make a big difference by just addressing people differently. The difference will be made on how you treat people. If he/she/it/they got kicked out from a Discord server that is associated with VATSIM, why wasn't this case taken up to VATSIM's VP Supervisors or even the DCRM? Maybe there are 2 sides to the story? I am supportive of your cause, in principle. But I also think that it would be counter-productive for your own cause if you made a big fuss out of nothing. I don't care whether you are yellow, green, black, brown, white, short, tall, gay, lesbian, nothing, both or even several persons. As long as we can just do our business here - and that is the simulation of aviation - it does not play the slightest role. Some people will probably raise an eye-brow upon making their first contact, but just be confident about it. Show competence and the will to learn about what we are doing here. And if somebody is abusing you or someone else, report it. PS: I forgot to mention this: airlines (in modern countries) are actually very good examples of inclusion - women have entered our flightdecks many, many yeeeeeeeeears ago. If there were more competent women who chose this career path, there would be even more working in this industry. Oh, yes, I can see your raised eye-brows, because I wrote "competent women": naturally I expect companies to only hire "competent men" as well. We just don't want to get into a situation where somebody gets preference for his gender or ethnicity - the person with the highest level of competence, potential and pleasant character should be chosen. Period.
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  8. I think that brings about the don't ask don't tell ideology that many militaries were famous for. It sadly brings about oppression as well. It makes being closeted important. And I don't think any of us romanticize oppression. While Trump, Kim Jong Un, Putin, and Merkel are all political conversations, and I'm not sure the aviation community can do much directly to address Myanmar genocide, topics like Black Lives Matter and LGBTQ+ existence are not political, and if we're talking about change, discussing inclusivity, and addressing our problems, all within VATSIM and aviation, I don't see why it wouldn't be relevant for the forum. It takes a lot to openly discuss these issues, and I just wanted to use this opportunity to also empower other members of the LGBTQ+ community to speak up. Also, I don't think any of us wanted to be special, but I also don't believe we can be called both non-standard and not be special at the same time (that was just a little bit of a wink moment there haha). Anyhow, back to the real conversation. None of us like to be victimized. I'm sure no one chooses to be oppressed, hurt, belittled, bullied, or be victims of hate crimes. Adding to that, none of the changes I've recommended are radical. It's just something to think about to help promote inclusivity. While ideal inclusivity is hard to achieve, if we didn't strive towards an inclusive environment, no one except for cis straight white men would have a say in anything and aviation would just be men in the flight deck and just women in the cabin. If you're interested in learning about the kind of oppression people face, and how we can together make VATSIM a truly safe and inclusive space, I think a great way to do that would be by addressing things you see wrong or that need change. I mean if our schools, legal systems, healthcare providers, among others can make changes, I'm sure we can at Vatsim too. It's just about acknowledging problems exist and trying to address it. If we just ignore it altogether, it would continue to be an unsafe and sometimes even toxic environment for many people in marginalized communities. While many FIRs and divisions have made efforts towards inclusivity (I've seen FIRs in Vatcan try – I can speak to that since they're the ones I'm most familiar with and have had this conversation with), but there are many central VATSIM policies that still continue to be hurtful. While I'm sure the intention of those policies were noble, the world has changed and issues have become clearer, and we've become more aware of right and wrong. I really would enjoy nothing more than not even having to post this, but the fact that I did and there are those who have interacted with it already goes to show there is a problem that needs addressing.
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  9. So, you see, you are already interpreting too much into my words. We all know what "standard" is: the absolute majority of human beings live a binary existence, man and women as partners. This is the standard (by evolution, otherwise we could not reproduce, easy to understand). Hence "non-standard" is just a way to describe other ways of human life. There is no judgement, it is merely a description. And again: it is being taken the wrong way, with assumptions what the author MIGHT think about these persons, although it is not the case. At all. And we also need to realize that there will never be a perfect and fully inclusive way: someone will always feel excluded or actually be excluded, because some humans are simply low life forms, stupid and intolerant. The best way to punish those individuals is by simply ignoring them - they can only take satisfaction from their threats and attacks when you recognize them and react to them. Ignorance is the best weapon. And at VATSIM it is also very easy: should a member of VATSIM talk down to you or badly about you, then there's the Vice President Supervisors. Report it to him or his team, provide evidence and witnesses - they take this stuff very serious and will not scrub it below the carpet. One piece of advice that I would like to also give is to stop victimizing yourself and people "who are different". Just be whatever you want to be, don't make a fuss about it, be respectful and others will be respectful about you, too. If they are not, ignore them or report them. Nobody really wants to discuss BLM, LGTB, Trump, Kim Jong Un, Putin, Merkel, the Myanmar genocide etc., this is not the right place for it. It's about aviation. I work in aviation. We have lots of crew members from the LGTB (mainly gay) community as highly competent and respected colleagues, not just in the cabin, but also on the flightdeck. It's not even a topic! Our topics are: competence and professionalism, we don't find our private preferences "special", it's just life, no matter who puts what body part into what or whom. Simple as that.
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  10. One thing that often gets misunderstood is that "he" or "she" is not meant litterally. I am pretty confident that almost everyone here (you never get to 100%) understands "he" (as in "he will make you intercept the ILS") not strictly as an ATCO being male. It's just for brevity and if we needed to write "he/she/it/they/them" our forums posts would start looking awkward and unreadable. Please, do not interpret too much from single words. I think that VATSIM is already very inclusive. I have been around here fore 20 years and since the beginning I have worked with numerous LGTB individuals who were regular members or part of local or regional staff. Never had there been an issue. We have quite a few non-standard individuals and we welcome and value them as much as much as everyone else. In fact we should be at the point where we do not even think much about this anymore and I am confident that most members do not have second thoughts when coming by an individual like this. We are one big group with a common hobby - everything else is completely irrelevant. As long as everyone behaves in a respectful way and this goes in both directions. And: a name is a name. If you prefer not stating your official name when logging in to VATSIM then use your VATSIM ID. And if someone calls you "Sir", who cares? Even in the real world this happens on a regular basis, because voices over the radio can be mistaken easily. Some ATCOs are heavy smokers and at some European airport there's a prominent lady with this loooooooooow voice who regularly gets called "Sir" 😄 So what, life goes on. Laugh about it, continue. If your voice is a male voice, people will rather address you as "Sir", because they cannot see you in person, do not take it personally. Most do NOT have a hidden agenda by doing this. In the end, a name is just a name on a piece of paper. What's important is the way you act. If you want to get your registered name changed, provide a legal document/evidence to VATSIM or if lacking this, present your case one more time, maybe with this discussion as reference. PS: as conclusion I would like to state that I find VATSIM a very inclusive place already. We cater for the blind, we accommodate the deaf, if you do not speak English very well, you can still speak your mother tongue when flying VFR or even IFR in your home-countries (in reference to your language) and for LGTB I never encountered a real issue within my reach.
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  11. While I support progressiveness and inclusiveness, please also understand that many who use traditional genderized pronouns are not doing so maliciously -- even those who have been educated on the matter and support it. A few of us have been around for a long time, and un-training ourselves from essentially subconscious habits that are decades old will not be an instant process. This matter is dear to my heart and affecting my immediate family as well -- and in the case of both my family-by-blood and my family within VATSIM, I hope that my or anyone's inability to adapt instantly to a (relatively) sudden cultural shift isn't mistaken for a lack of support or understanding.
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  12. This topic is near to me. I just recently changed my name with VATSIM and it was a process - I had to provide supporting documentation (which I luckily had, but I know that many people do not have this). I put my pronouns (she/her) in my controller info. I sign in as "Alexandra Robison". I still get "sir"ed. Personally, I have accepted the "gender neutral" state of terms like "man" or "dude", but I know people who would be bothered about things like that. Overall, I have not encountered much LGBT+ hate. My ARTCC was supportive of me when I came out. However I do agree that we should promote inclusivity. All in all, you make great points!
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  13. Diversity is not just about gender or sexuality it is also about the people who are blind, have hearing issues, or other personal circumstances. Once we can great a diverse leadership within vatsim so we can improve upon the inclusivity of the organization. We all share the same passion for aviation. one thing I like to share coming out is not about sexuality or gender. Coming out is about letting others know who you really are as a person and this applies to all people. You can come out due to autism or another mental health problem or a disease.
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