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Ruth McTighe 824054

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Posts posted by Ruth McTighe 824054

  1. Ruth,

     

    Thanks for the input, but one other question. On the setup instructions, it says to pick between roger wilco or avc, do I need either of these for the voice option.

     

    You don't need either to connect to VATSIM. They are now only used for pilot-pilot comms e.g. within a VA. I've just been looking at the set-up guide in the PRC and I suspect it may be a little out-of-date.

     

    Ruth

  2. VATSIM is proud to announce the release of VRC1.1 by Ross Carlson. Please see the list of enhancements below. You can download VRC1.1 here:

     

    http://www.metacraft.com/VRC/download.shtml

     

    Virtual Tower View. VRC can now create an MSFS multiplayer session and populate it with aircraft. By connecting FS9 to this session, you can have a realistic "out-the-window" view of the airport environment. Be sure to download the model sets if you don't already have SB3 installed.

     

    Simple radar mode. This mode is what used to be called the Ground mode in version 1.0.

     

    Ground radar mode. This is a new mode which shows the callsign, aircraft type, and ground speed.

     

    Park Air radar mode. This mode emulates the approach control radars used in the United Kingdom.

     

    TAAATS radar mode. This mode emulates the TAAATS system used within and around Australia.

     

    PSR radar mode. This mode provides basic "skin paint" primary radar targets without SSR information.

     

    3D radar mode. This unique mode provides a 3D "wire frame" view of your airspace, with targets represented as basic 3D models. This is an excellent tool for teaching students how the airspace is structured. Brings a new aspect to how air traffic moves.

     

    Colorized sector areas. VRC now supports the ability to draw filled, colored polygons on the screen, to represent airways, special-use airspace, bodies of water, etc. This is also useful for creating ground radar maps. These polygons, referred to as "REGIONs" are available in .sct2 format sector files.

     

    Static text labels. You can now define simple lines of text to display on your scope at a specified lat/lon. This is useful for labeling items such as taxiways, MVA values, special-use airspace names, etc. These labels are available in .sct2 format sector files.

     

    F2 allows you to quickly add a weather button for the destination field for the selected aircraft. This is handy when controlling aircraft flying into satellite fields, so that you can quickly pull up the weather and monitor altimeter changes.

     

    The new .center2 command allows you to quickly center both your scope and the range rings at the specified point.

     

    Right-click context menus. Most areas in VRC now have right-click context menus, allowing you to quickly access important functions with only the mouse. For example, by right-clicking a target on your scope, you can quickly initiate a handoff to another controller. Right-click context menus are available for targets on the scope, entries in the arrival/departures list, entries in the controller list, entries in the weather panel, entries in chat group member lists, and flight strips.

     

    Profile import/export. You can now easily share profiles and common settings using the profile import, export and merge functions.

     

    Reminder lights. A new button in the button bar contains four reminder lights. These lights remind you if you have a chat message waiting, a pending handoff, aircraft in your reminder list, or if your microphone is muted.

     

    Tool window hotkeys. Using the Alt key plus a number, you can quickly show or hide the various tool windows. See the Command Reference for details.

     

    The new CTRL+G key combination provides quick access to the Diagrams Window for the currently active scope.

     

    Callsigns in the reminder list are now sorted by how long they have been on the list, so you can quickly see which aircraft has been waiting the longest.

     

    The SELCAL window. VRC now provides a window listing all aircraft in range which have a SELCAL code in their flight plan remarks. By double-clicking an entry in the list, you can quickly send a SELCAL alert to the specified aircraft.

     

    Mutable microphone. VRC has integrated voice comms. There is no need for external third party applications for talking to pilots or other controllers. You can now mute your microphone if you don't wish to have a hot microphone when being overridden.

     

    The new .fd command allows you to use aliases to toggle diagrams on/off.

     

    Session statistics. VRC now keeps track of various operational statistics during your session. You can view these stats with the .showstats command.

     

    New alias variables and functions. You can now insert additional data in an alias. The new variables and functions include $atiscode, $type(), $route and $aircraft.

  3. Bager , there's lots and lots of stuff available for people training as VATSIM controllers. It's on the individual country/division websites as training and some of the procedures are specific to particular countries. I suggest you go to www.vatsim.net and click on "New ATC Start Here" which will tell you where to find it all.

     

    Which country do you want to train in?

     

    Ruth

    VATGOV7

    Vice President - Communications

  4. VATSIM is delighted to announce the release of version 1.2 of ASRC – the Advanced Simulated Radar Client. Mike Evans, the developer, has created new features which make the life of the virtual controller even better than before.

     

    These new features include

    - floating windows to provide additional views

    - multiple radar sensors to allow multiple visibility centers

    - a flight strip bay

    - major and minor bug fixes

     

    Further information and a direct link to the software in the avsim file library can be found at www.asrc.info

  5. In the UK realworld, it depends on local procedures. Many of the airports under the London TMA are "free-flow", which means TWR can launch them without contacting the en-route controller (this is frequently LON_CTR, not a DEP or APP). The restrictions of the SID will hopefully stop the aircraft crashing into anything else before the pilot contacts CTR. In this case, CTR knows the aircraft has been shipped, because the flight strip will be given to him, or will appear on his screen.

     

    If the SID has implications for other aircraft e.g. climbing out of EGLC under the EGLL arrivals, TWR will call CTR and verbally request a release. There are SOPs for all SIDs. This is CTRs opportunity to put on any restrictions like an altitude, heading or delay.

     

    TWR: London, City Tower

    CTR: City tower, go ahead

    TWR: BAW123 from EGLC BPK3T departurre, request release

    CTR: BAW123 released

    or

    CTR: BAW123 heading after departure 090 deg, released

     

    As there is no radaar handoff, what LON_CTR does have to do is to request each new aircraft to Squawk Ident to correlate the squawkcode and the callsign. This causes VATSIM pilots no end of problems, as many of them have never heard the term before.

     

    Doing a radar handoff on VATSIM is actually the lazy way of identifying an aircraft, but I must admit, if CTR is covering a lot of airports, especially top-down, things that make life easier are welcome! For realism I would prefer NO radar handoff, if only the pilots would Squawk Ident!

     

    Ruth

  6. You defently need to know more about this issue since it is used for navigation on every flight.

     

    I was under the impression that a pilot has every right to not accept a SID/STAR, particularly when they are new. If it was busy, like during a fly-in, it is a different story, but if it is fairly quite, the controller should either give you vectors to your first fix, or explain, n a private chat, what a SID is and where to find the info.

     

    Yes, controllers should help especially if a pilot is new, but that doesn't mean that pilots should take the view that they don't NEED to learn about what SIDS and STARS are.

     

    Ruth

    VATGOV7

  7. I have been all over that page. How do I actually get online in multiplayer? Do I start up FS2004 and click on multiplayer? Do I start with a flight plan then start FS? Do I log on somewhere first? If there's a page that explains this, I havent't found it and I've spent a couple hours looking! I'm sorry. Apparently, I need to be led by the hand to get started.

     

    Thanks for the help.

    Mark

     

    I suspect you haven't found the right section in the PRC. Section 103 tells you all about how to set up your software and get online. Basically, once your have installed Squawkbox (and you don't need FSUIPC - it's built in) you open MSFS first, then Squawkbox (from the modules menu in FS), then log on, then file your flight plan.

     

    Ruth

    VATGOV7

    Vice Presdient - Communications

     

    Is this the same procedure if you are using FSX and FSInn 1.2 ? There is no modules menu in FSX. So how do you start FSInn from within FSX?

     

    FSInn for FS9 uses a drop downmenu called CoPilot - I presume it's the same for FSX. Have you looked at www.vatsim.net/prc?

     

    Ruth

  8. and to simplify matters, all you need is FSInn 1.2 You don't need Roger Wilco or AVC, as the voice transmission software is built into FSInn. The instructions are in section 103h of the PRC

     

    Ruth

    VATGOV7

    Vice president - Communications

  9. It's out! Microsoft's long-awaited Flight Simulator X has been released, and flight simmers everywhere are trying it out. VATSIM is ready and waiting for you to try it online.

     

    FSInn 1.2 is the software you need to connect FSX to the VATSIM servers, and it can be downloaded free from www.mcdu.com For those of you who use Squawkbox 3, the FSX compatible version (Squawkbox 4) is currently in closed beta testing and should be available soon.

     

    If you have found this website through FSX, we welcome you to VATSIM - online flying really "as real as it gets". Please browse through the website, and in particular the Pilot Resource Center at www.vatsim.net/prc We look forward to your company - you'll soon be as addicted as we are!

     

    Ruth McTighe

    VATGOV7

    Vice President - Communications

  10. Good point Luca, but in reality, who cares what the altimeter reads while you're on the ground with the standard datum set? Doesn't really do you much good there

     

    Is there any situation where a controller would give out a QFE? Or that the pilot would actually use QFE, instead of doing the (usually) simple subraction in his head on QNH?

     

    QFE is often used by VFR aircraft in the UK, esepcially when doing circuit practice. The military also use it quite a lot I believe

     

    Ruth

    VATGOV7

  11. Have you been to read the Pilot Resoucre Center at www.vatsim.net/prc? There are lots of useful tutorials. You can also reach it from the vatsim.net front page by clicking on "new pilots start here".

     

    If you look in the pilots forums on this board you will also find lots of stuff. This thread http://forums.vatsim.net/viewtopic.php?t=13497&highlight= may be particularly helpful

     

    Ruth

    VATGOV7

    Vice President, Communications

  12. I have been all over that page. How do I actually get online in multiplayer? Do I start up FS2004 and click on multiplayer? Do I start with a flight plan then start FS? Do I log on somewhere first? If there's a page that explains this, I havent't found it and I've spent a couple hours looking! I'm sorry. Apparently, I need to be led by the hand to get started.

     

    Thanks for the help.

    Mark

     

    I suspect you haven't found the right section in the PRC. Section 103 tells you all about how to set up your software and get online. Basically, once your have installed Squawkbox (and you don't need FSUIPC - it's built in) you open MSFS first, then Squawkbox (from the modules menu in FS), then log on, then file your flight plan.

     

    Ruth

    VATGOV7

    Vice Presdient - Communications

  13. HI I did that but it keeps telling me file is coruppted can not down load Thanks any other help would be great if you can .

     

    I've just downloaded ServInfo from avsim.com with no problems at all. I'd suggest you try again direct from www.avsim.com. It's a program that's well worth having

     

    Ruth

    VATGOV7

    Vice President - Communications, VATSIM

  14. You can see which controllers are online by looking at the right hand box in the SB window. Only those radio frequencies will be active. If you tune to any other frequency then nothing will happen with the radio. I'd suggest go to a not too busy airport and do some tests with a friendly tower or ground controller.

     

    Ruth

    VATGOV7

  15. I am using VRC. In the PDF file it said I can download sector files from Vatsim.net

     

    I am using

     

    Region/Division

     

    Europe - United Kingdom

     

    On the PDF file

     

    Download the radar map for the area you want to observe. These maps are known as sector

    files, and are available on the websites of the individual VATSIM divisions (see the links on

    the right hand column of www.vatsim.net). The UK sector files can be found at www.vatsimuk.

    org on the Downloads page. The UK area file covers the whole of the UK and can be

    found in Downloads>sector files>CTR-TMA. You may also want to download a more

    detailed file for particular airports.

     

    The answer is in the quote you've posted - go to the website of the division you want to control in - and you can find the link to that in the right hand column of the front page at www.vatsim.net There's a typo in the UK URL which I hadn't spotted before but will get corrected - the direct link is www.vatsim-uk.org (which actually now redirects to www.vatsim-uk.co.uk)

     

    Ruth

    VATGOV7

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