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By Kenneth Haught 1067681
#533096 Are you trying to follow the ILS to land maually, or perform an auto-land with the ILS? Navigating via the ILS is relatively straightforward, however if you're trying to let the airplane land itself it requires a more complex aircraft and sometimes special procedures depending on the aircraft you're using.
By Mark Wolpert 847924
#533097 Which aircraft are you trying it with ? If its say a 737, is it PMDG or default/freeware?

Basically you need to understand how the particular aircraft you are using captures the ILS. For example the PMDG 737 requires you to tune the ILS frequency (both for autoland). The FS labs A320, just requires that the runway is programmed into the FMGC.

Once above is understood, you generally approach the runway heading at an intercept angle of about 30 degrees. Speed is also important, many new pilots approach way too fast....shoot for 190 knots in a jet. Altitude of about 3000ft and far enough out (10miles) that you are below the glideslope.

Arm LOC to capture the inbound course and once captures press APP mode to follow the ILS vertical path to the runway. Start reducing speed to 160 knots (aircraft dependent) once you start down and at 2500 feet above the threshold lower the gear. Continue to lower the speed at 4 or 5 DME from the runway to the approach speed plus 5 knots. There is some wind correction required but this is probably good enough to get going.

Autoland likely requires you to press a second autopilot, otherwise disconnect the A/P when stable (say at 200 feet) and manually land.

hopefull this helps but please post where the issues are and details of the aircraft.
By Evan Olivas 1455734
#533103
Mark Wolpert 847924 wrote:Which aircraft are you trying it with ? If its say a 737, is it PMDG or default/freeware?

Basically you need to understand how the particular aircraft you are using captures the ILS. For example the PMDG 737 requires you to tune the ILS frequency (both for autoland). The FS labs A320, just requires that the runway is programmed into the FMGC.

Once above is understood, you generally approach the runway heading at an intercept angle of about 30 degrees. Speed is also important, many new pilots approach way too fast....shoot for 190 knots in a jet. Altitude of about 3000ft and far enough out (10miles) that you are below the glideslope.

Arm LOC to capture the inbound course and once captures press APP mode to follow the ILS vertical path to the runway. Start reducing speed to 160 knots (aircraft dependent) once you start down and at 2500 feet above the threshold lower the gear. Continue to lower the speed at 4 or 5 DME from the runway to the approach speed plus 5 knots. There is some wind correction required but this is probably good enough to get going.

Autoland likely requires you to press a second autopilot, otherwise disconnect the A/P when stable (say at 200 feet) and manually land.

hopefull this helps but please post where the issues are and details of the aircraft.



B738. I know the procedure, but I just do't know when to switch fromGPS to NAV, when the morse code beeps from the runway frequency????
By Kenneth Haught 1067681
#533107
Evan Olivas 1455734 wrote:B738. I know the procedure, but I just do't know when to switch fromGPS to NAV, when the morse code beeps from the runway frequency????


Again it's important to know what model of B738 you're referring to. If it's a default-type model, or a payware which models the systems more accurately.

Presumably based on your questions of "from GPS to NAV" it's a default aircraft system. In that case, you would want to switch to HDG hold once you're pointed toward the intercept point (usually as Mark said it 2000ish AGL and 10 miles, but check the charts for your particular airport). You would then verify that you're receiving the correct station on your NAV1 radio (via the Morse code IDent or the displayed alphanumeric code if you have such equipment). If you are, you can change to NAV/LOC mode(s). Confirm you're below the glidepath, and arm APP for vertical assistance.

It's a similar procedure for most realistically modeled B738's, however it can vary some depending on how they are configured, and again whether you are attempted to perform and autoland or just want guidance to a stable position to complete the approach.
By Evan Olivas 1455734
#533120
Kenneth Haught 1067681 wrote:
Evan Olivas 1455734 wrote:B738. I know the procedure, but I just do't know when to switch fromGPS to NAV, when the morse code beeps from the runway frequency????


Again it's important to know what model of B738 you're referring to. If it's a default-type model, or a payware which models the systems more accurately.

Presumably based on your questions of "from GPS to NAV" it's a default aircraft system. In that case, you would want to switch to HDG hold once you're pointed toward the intercept point (usually as Mark said it 2000ish AGL and 10 miles, but check the charts for your particular airport). You would then verify that you're receiving the correct station on your NAV1 radio (via the Morse code IDent or the displayed alphanumeric code if you have such equipment). If you are, you can change to NAV/LOC mode(s). Confirm you're below the glidepath, and arm APP for vertical assistance.

It's a similar procedure for most realistically modeled B738's, however it can vary some depending on how they are configured, and again whether you are attempted to perform and autoland or just want guidance to a stable position to complete the approach.



This helped a lot, going in fo ranother try. thanks!!
By Nick Warren 813047
#533152 Disconnect Autopilot. Fly a 20-30 degree intercept angle at or above the charted altitude, or as vectored. Begin turn to final when needles begin to align, maintain needle alignment horizontally and vertically in the center of the PFD. Establish final approach speed. If the horizontal needle moves down, pitch down or reduce power. If it moves up, then pitch up or increase power. If it moves right, slightly bank or yaw right, if it goes to the left, then go left. Repeat inputs consistently until reaching the round-out and flare. Pretend you are the pilot and not the aircraft's computer.