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U.S. Air Force Flights


Nathan Isaacson 1258087
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Hi,

 

I was interested in doing a short flight across the coast of California (probably KLAX-KSFO) in a Bombardier Challenger 300. The aircraft would have a USAF paint job (much like that of Air Force One), but the call sign would be "Executive One" (the official call sign for any civilian aircraft that is carrying the president that is not the USAF 747). My first question is am I allowed to do this? I'm not sure if I would be in compliance with VATSIM regulations by attempting this flight. My second question is what would my call sign be? I don't want to put in "Executive One" because it is unprofessional and doesn't even fit and I don't want to put "A1" (A for Air Force) because my aircraft isn't Air Force One. Lastly, I believe the correct ICAO for this flight would be AIO, but if you could confirm that, I would very much appreciate it.

 

Thanks,

Nathan

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https://www.faa.gov/air_traffic/publications/ATpubs/FSS/fss0602.html

 

Section 2. Flight Plan Proposals

6-2-1. FLIGHT PLAN RECORDING

 

Record flight plans on FAA Form 7233�1, Flight Plan, or electronic equivalent. Completion of all blocks or fields is not required in every case, and all items filed are not always transmitted. Use authorized abbreviations where possible. The instructions below are for completion of FAA Form 7233�1. For electronic versions of flight plan forms, refer to that system's operating instructions.

 

NOTE-

Use FAA Form 7233�4, International Flight Plan, for international flights as well as flights in domestic U.S. airspace in which automatic [Mod - Happy Thoughts]ignment of RNAV routes is desired. See para 6�2�3, Flight Plans with Area Navigation (RNAV) Routes in Domestic U.S. Airspace.

 

a. Item 1. Type of flight plan. Check the appropriate box.

 

b. Item 2. Aircraft Identification. Enter as follows, but do not exceed seven alphanumeric characters:

 

1. Civil Aircraft Including Air Carrier. Aircraft letter/digit registration including the letter �T� prefix for air taxi aircraft, the letter �L� for MEDEVAC aircraft, or the three�letter aircraft company designator specified in FAA Order JO 7340.2, Contractions, followed by the trip or the flight number.

 

EXAMPLE-

N12345

TN5552Q

AAL192

LN751B

 

NOTE-

The letter �L� must not be entered in Item 2 of the flight plan for air carrier or air taxi MEDEVAC aircraft. Include the word �MEDEVAC� in the remarks section of the flight plan.

 

2. U.S. Military Aircraft.

 

(a) Use the military abbreviation followed by the last five digits of the aircraft's number. For certain tactical mission aircraft, enter the [Mod - Happy Thoughts]igned three�to�six letter code word followed by a one�to�four digit number. (See TBL 6�2�1)

 

TBL 6-2-1

Military

 

Abbreviation

Military Service

 

A

USAF

 

C

Coast Guard

 

E

Air Evacuation

 

G

Air/Army National Guard

 

L

LOGAIR (USAF contract)

 

R

Army

 

RCH

REACH (USAF Air Mobility Command)

 

S

Special Air Mission

 

VM

Marine Corps

 

VV

Navy

 

 

(b) Aircraft carrying the President, Vice President, and/or their family members will use the identifiers in the following tables. (See TBL 6-2-2 and TBL 6-2-3)

 

TBL 6-2-2

President and Family

 

Service

President

Family

 

Air Force

AF1

EXEC1F

 

Marine

VM1

EXEC1F

 

Navy

VV1

EXEC1F

 

Army

RR1

EXEC1F

 

Coast Guard

C1

EXEC1F

 

Guard

G1

EXEC1F

 

Commercial

EXEC1

EXEC1F

 

It'd be "EXEC1" as your login callsign. Also yes you can do this on VATSIM, just don't expect nor demand any special or expedited handling simply because you are flying with that callsign.

Brad Lee

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My first question is am I allowed to do this? I'm not sure if I would be in compliance with VATSIM regulations by attempting this flight.
Yep, nothing wrong with that or Air Force One (though the latter is almost guaranteed to earn you an eyeroll and heavy sigh from the controller ).

 

I don't want to put "A1" (A for Air Force) because my aircraft isn't Air Force One.
You'd also want to avoid using A1 since A1 is a steak sauce; AF1 is a callsign (namely "Air Force One").
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To answer your question, Yes; However I am going to hit on a few other aspects of your operation if I may. Before I get started let me state that you are more than welcome to use Executive one as a call sign.

 

I was interested in expanding on the use of the call sign and the type of aircraft. You mention that the aircraft you are operating uses USAF paint scheme. I would [Mod - Happy Thoughts]ume that this is because it would be an actual USAF aircraft. The USAF uses a wide variety of aircraft for transportation such as Gulfsteams, Learjets, and as you have Bombardier aircraft. Just because it is a Bombardier does not make it civil. It depends on who is operating the aircraft. If the USAF is operating the aircraft (again indicated by the paint scheme you mentioned) than the AC would operate as Air Force One. AF1 is a callsign not one particular aircraft. Any USAF aircraft carrying the president whether it is a VC25, C130, C17, B737, MD80, or any Bombardier aircraft would use the handle AF1. When not carrying the president USAF aircraft typically would use A#### (Airforce + Mission number), SAM#### (Special Air Mission + Mission number) or another unique callsign.

 

EXEC1 would be for civil operated aircraft such as if the president hopped aboard a United operated aircraft or a private aircraft of a friend. (Does anyone know of EXEC1 being used anytime recently?)

 

Lastly, Air Force one use "AF1" all other flights Air Force flights would use just the "A".

 

Edit: If I happened to repeat anything sry. When I started writing the post I was the first one but others finished before I.

Edited by Guest

The above pertains to United States

 

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(Does anyone know of EXEC1 being used anytime recently?)

 

On January 20, 2009, the military helicopter that is normally designated as "Marine One" was given the call sign "Executive One" when it took on George W. Bush, whose term as president had just expired.

 

Not exactly by-the-book as the usual SAM# flight the outgoing President gets, but meh.

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Executive_One

Brad Lee

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To answer your question, Yes; However I am going to hit on a few other aspects of your operation if I may. Before I get started let me state that you are more than welcome to use Executive one as a call sign.

 

I was interested in expanding on the use of the call sign and the type of aircraft. You mention that the aircraft you are operating uses USAF paint scheme. I would [Mod - Happy Thoughts]ume that this is because it would be an actual USAF aircraft. The USAF uses a wide variety of aircraft for transportation such as Gulfsteams, Learjets, and as you have Bombardier aircraft. Just because it is a Bombardier does not make it civil. It depends on who is operating the aircraft. If the USAF is operating the aircraft (again indicated by the paint scheme you mentioned) than the AC would operate as Air Force One. AF1 is a callsign not one particular aircraft. Any USAF aircraft carrying the president whether it is a VC25, C130, C17, B737, MD80, or any Bombardier aircraft would use the handle AF1. When not carrying the president USAF aircraft typically would use A#### (Airforce + Mission number), SAM#### (Special Air Mission + Mission number) or another unique callsign.

 

EXEC1 would be for civil operated aircraft such as if the president hopped aboard a United operated aircraft or a private aircraft of a friend. (Does anyone know of EXEC1 being used anytime recently?)

 

Lastly, Air Force one use "AF1" all other flights Air Force flights would use just the "A".

 

Edit: If I happened to repeat anything sry. When I started writing the post I was the first one but others finished before I.

 

Yes, you are correct that no specific aircraft always uses the call sign "Air Force One;" if the USAF operated 747 was not carrying the president, and only carrying the vice president for example, it would be "Air Force Two." About the "Executive" call sign, any USAF operated aircraft, such as the G650s or the B737s, carrying only the president's family or members of the white house can be referred to "Executive One Foxtrot," at the discretion of the Secret Service. I believe you are correct about the "Executive One" call sign though; and I think Richard Nixon used to travel on a United Airlines flight regularly to California that was given the call sign "Executive One."

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The two rarest callsigns are now R1 and V1, V1 having only been used by a fixed wing aircraft during George Bush Jr's "Mission Accomplished" speech.

 

I can't think of a circomestance when R1 would have been used except for Bush and Obama flying through Iraq and Afghanistan.

 

One of the rarest callsigns I don't hear now a days is Archangel one. Yesterday someone asked about CELNAV and I got to share a story about the one guy who requested it. Where you been?

The above pertains to United States

 

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  • 2 weeks later...

EXEC1 would be for civil operated aircraft such as if the president hopped aboard a United operated aircraft or a private aircraft of a friend. (Does anyone know of EXEC1 being used anytime recently?)

President Obama flew to Bar Harbor Maine in July 2010 (KBHB) in what looked to be a Gulfstream, I do believe they were using the EXEC1 callsign.

Kevin Copeland

Air Traffic Director

VATUSA Southern Region

VATSIM Supervisor

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The aircraft the president is flying in becomes the #1 aircraft of that branch. Air Force 1, Navy 1 etc. Civilian aircraft would become Exec1. *At any time the secret service may elect to not use this or any call sign for security reasons*.

 

For example Bill Clinton flew to Pakistan with 3 identical biz jets to avoid an attack, calling one of those A or Exec1 would have given away his position.

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Yes, the Secret Service operates a fleet of Gulfstrems, 737s, etc. I am not quite sure if they use the call sign "EXEC1" because I thought any aircraft that the president was on would automatically become "Air Force One." It's a little confusing.

 

Depends who operates the plane. If it's an Air Force plan, then yes. Otherwise, no. Imagine the feel of a Navy pilot having to change from saying "Navy"all the time to now having to say "Air Force". What a downgrade. (the jab at the Air Force is only because I am in the Navy )

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  • 2 weeks later...
The two rarest callsigns are now R1 and V1, V1 having only been used by a fixed wing aircraft during George Bush Jr's "Mission Accomplished" speech.

 

I can't think of a circomestance when R1 would have been used except for Bush and Obama flying through Iraq and Afghanistan.

 

One of the rarest callsigns I don't hear now a days is Archangel one. Yesterday someone asked about CELNAV and I got to share a story about the one guy who requested it. Where you been?

 

Don't know how I missed this post, but I've been away from controlling due to personal obligations but I'm getting back on the mic!

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