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Still can't find complete flight plans for Europe


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What I believe you said here, I wrote earlier, namely that you start the route with the departure airport transition fix selected by the pilot. So essentially there is no SID within the flight plan fixes. BTW that same DVR departure route could also be filed as DET XXX XXX, IIRC.

 

Flightplans should start with the SID departure minus the actual designator ...

 

 

there is also a DET departure form EGLL as well as the DVR departure, so if they filed DET then they would be given a DET departure and not a DVR departure. and what i was trying to get across more than the designator was the fact taht UK TMA controllers should issue the STAR and landing runway on initial contact

 

Wot he said...

"Oh! You meant my other right!!"

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  • 5 weeks later...
a. What is the meaning of the CLR-limit remark on STAR charts, usually at the transition fix?

 

If you are cleared onto the STAR (either by filing it or by being [Mod - Happy Thoughts]igned by ATC enroute) you may not fly farther than this point, unless comms failure happens. It's the limit of your clearance.

 

Best regards,

Daniel

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Thanks Daniel. To me it is confusing that a procedure cannot be flown from its very beginning, I simply cannot understand its logic. I could understand a chart reading something like: "STAR clearance required beyound this point"

.

a. What is the meaning of the CLR-limit remark on STAR charts, usually at the transition fix?

 

If you are cleared onto the STAR (either by filing it or by being [Mod - Happy Thoughts]igned by ATC enroute) you may not fly farther than this point, unless comms failure happens. It's the limit of your clearance.

 

Best regards,

Daniel

Regards, Opher Ben Peretz

Senior Instructor

APP_5106_LLBG.jpg

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If you are cleared onto the STAR (either by filing it or by being [Mod - Happy Thoughts]igned by ATC enroute) you may not fly farther than this point, unless comms failure happens. It's the limit of your clearance.
Thanks Daniel. To me it is confusing that a procedure cannot be flown from its very beginning, I simply cannot understand its logic. I could understand a chart reading something like: "STAR clearance required beyound this point"

 

Ah,

 

I think there´s a misunderstanding here. That clearance limit means that you explicitely need to be cleared for the procedure, and that otherwise your enroute clearance ends here. Think of them as "hard limits".

 

Take for example the STAR chart (or the transition chart, either is fine) for Frankfurt. You will immediate notice the clearance limits GED, PSA, OSMAX and ROLIS. Without an explicit ATC clearance beyond this point these are your clearance limits, and if you experience a comm failure just before them, your have to enter a hold there (that´s why these clearance limits always have defined holdings).

best regards,

 

Martin Georg

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Hello Martin,

thanks for your response, this is exactly my understanding. My original question was due to the EDDF STARs which puzzled me. Usually I would expect the route controller, following initial descent clearance, to specify the target STAR, long before handing the flight over to terminal approach control, thereby clearing the pilot to descend on the STAR. Many STARs have CLR-limit at the end of the STAR, not the beginning. For example, EGLL, similar in traffic complexity and quantity to EDDF, limits arriving traffic to STAR end, separated by roughly 30 air NM and FL70 from touchdown . This is equivalent as example to MTR for EDDF runway 25 OSMAX 1W/ ROLIS 1W STARs, not 50NM and 15,000 feet earlier. I am trying to understand why a procedure would be limited that way.

 

 

If you are cleared onto the STAR (either by filing it or by being [Mod - Happy Thoughts]igned by ATC enroute) you may not fly farther than this point, unless comms failure happens. It's the limit of your clearance.
Thanks Daniel. To me it is confusing that a procedure cannot be flown from its very beginning, I simply cannot understand its logic. I could understand a chart reading something like: "STAR clearance required beyound this point"

 

Ah,

 

I think there´s a misunderstanding here. That clearance limit means that you explicitely need to be cleared for the procedure, and that otherwise your enroute clearance ends here. Think of them as "hard limits".

 

Take for example the STAR chart (or the transition chart, either is fine) for Frankfurt. You will immediate notice the clearance limits GED, PSA, OSMAX and ROLIS. Without an explicit ATC clearance beyond this point these are your clearance limits, and if you experience a comm failure just before them, your have to enter a hold there (that´s why these clearance limits always have defined holdings).

Regards, Opher Ben Peretz

Senior Instructor

APP_5106_LLBG.jpg

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I am trying to understand why a procedure would be limited that way.

 

It´s because at these CL´s different procedures are beginning. In real life in EDDF, the STARs are never flown, they are just filed and there for the purpose of comm failure procedures. Traffic is handed over to the arrival controllers (these days also called "Langen Radar" - argh :) ) before reaching the clearance limit, and these arrival controllers the issue the appropriate clearance for the arrival phase.

 

In EDDF, traffic is usually cleared for the RNAV transition, or sent directly to certain RNAV waypoints to seepd up traffic flow. Non-RNAV traffic is seldom these days (even military traffic usually is RNAV-capable now), and in these seldom cases, vectors are usually used.

best regards,

 

Martin Georg

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