Jump to content

computer restarts for no reason


Recommended Posts

hello guys

 

my computer has stated restarting itself for no reason. I'll be playing a game or working on homework and with no warning it will just restart. I installed Norton and this started to happen but i have no cause to believe that Norton is the reason behind this. does anyone know what might be happening. I have windows XP with SP2

 

thank you

 

Michael

Link to post
Share on other sites

It is probably full of dust and is overheating. I would suggest opening the side cover and cleaning it out. Go to a local Best Buy or Staples and get a can of compressed air. Or if you have air compressor in the garage, use that. Also, make sure any fans, etc. are clean as well.

 

John

John Navara

 

A mile of highway can take you a mile, a mile of runway can take you anywhere.

Link to post
Share on other sites

If it has only recently started happening then my guess would be overheating as well. Apart from just cleaning it out also check any detachable dust filters for cleanliness and turn the machine on with the cover off so that you can see if all the fans are actually running, especially the one on the CPU!

Bill Casey

Link to post
Share on other sites

It appears that a fan is not working in the computer and that might play a part in this. I'm going to put a new fan in from another computer and see if that helps. if it still happens ill look into the power supply.

 

Thank you guys for all the help. VATSIM really does have the best people!

 

Thank you

Michael

Link to post
Share on other sites

EEK! Fans not working can have a bad ending.

 

Even when your computer is dust free and the fans work properly the computer can lock up and restart. While the chances of it doing so are cut down...there are still some errors in Windows that will cause it to do so.

 

For all of those interested... I use a simple program called "Speedfan" to keep an eye on some of the temps in my computer.

 

It is a free program that uses the internal temp sensors on your devices to tell you their temperatures.

 

If you keep having the problem and are not sure if it is temperature caused...get that program or one similar to it (other people may know of others that work better).

 

 

 

Also, have you had any performance problems...especially right before it restarts? When your hard drive or processor (or both!) get to higher temperature their performance goes down.

5968.png

westportbanner350pxnt5.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Windows XP is configured to automatically restart if it crashes. Go to Control Panel, System, Advanced tab, under Startup and Recovery click the Settings button, and uncheck the "automatically restart" checkbox.

 

This way you will be able to see the blue screen (or STOP error, as it's actually called) if one occurs. If the computer still just spontaneously reboots a hardware issue is likely. If you do get a blue screen, it's probably a driver, and Norton is definitely capable of causing blue screens as well so I would at least try to disable it to see if that helps.

Creator of VATSIM Monitor, a sidebar gadget for Windows Vista.

 

7996.png

Link to post
Share on other sites

On the other hand, if by chance it's actually 95° C (usually temperatures are displayed in Celsius), that's quite warm for a processor.

 

A failed fan and mysterious restarts together generally spell an overheated CPU. If the CPU does not have built-in temperature protection, it may be damaged by the overheating, in which case you might still get restarts even after replacing the fan. AMD processors have been notorious for this in the past (I lost to machines to their lack of temperature protection); I don't know if they've fixed that, since I got tired of the losses and switched back to Intel.

8564.png
Link to post
Share on other sites
He has stated its in fairnheit.

 

Ah, that must be what the "F" after the number meant, eh?

 

Motherboards and other software increasingly state temperatures in Celsius, so if he read a Celsius temperature as Fahrenheit, the processor could be cooking. Conversely, if it was truly a Fahrenheit temperature, that's only 35° C, which is remarkably (suspiciously) cool for a processor under load in a typical PC.

8564.png
Link to post
Share on other sites

Please sign in to comment

You will be able to leave a comment after signing in



Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...