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USA challenging approaches


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Like Andrew Rogers said for a challenging approach... Try to shoot the LDA/DME 26L at Honolulu. If you want an approach with terrain, also try the visual approach runway 8 at Hilo (PHTO) International. Requires you to almost follow the shoreline on your descent to turn for about a mile and a half final.... Venture off to the right and you hit Mauna Loa

 

Andrew,

Ya i used to work the rides up there and your right... Big shot is the only original ride left up there.

Instructor3/pilot

TA

HCF

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Oh, I knew you knew better, Gary. I apologize if you thought I was warning you personally. I wasn't.

 

I read that NASA has some modified bizjets that they use for practicing shuttle approaches. I don't know if they are modified just with software, or what. 20 degrees! I wonder if spoilers would be enough.

 

Students of aeronautics will notice that the glide slope is actually shallower for a heavier shuttle (18 degrees heavy, 20 degrees light). It might seem backwards, but it's a fact that that every glider pilot knows, and every powered pilot ought to. The higher your wing loading, the better your glide ratio. But that better glide ratio occurs at a higher airspeed. So when the shuttle is coming in heavy, it comes in very fast, and on a shallower glideslope. When it comes in light, in comes in slower, and on a steeper glideslope. It's the same thing for light plane pilots. If you go engine out max gross, your best glide speed is faster than if you go engine out lightly loaded. In the Piper Clipper I fly in X-Plane, its best glide speed at max gross is 80 mph; lightly loaded, it's 70 mph. It's worth knowing the difference.

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I read that NASA has some modified bizjets that they use for practicing shuttle approaches. I don't know if they are modified just with software, or what. 20 degrees! I wonder if spoilers would be enough.

 

Here's an article from NASA about the Shuttle Training Aircraft: http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/behindscenes/shuttletrainingaircraft.html

 

We also get a boatload of NASA T-38s flying back and forth between EFD (Houston Area) and ELP, but I somehow doubt that's all shuttle related. One sight I found said perhaps they are used for practice with G-Forces, but they just annoy us in (mostly) straight and level flight by being non-RVSM. Oh well...

 

~Nate

Nate Johns

 

"All things are difficult before they are easy."

- Dr. Thomas Fuller, Gnomologia, 1732

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